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The Benefits of Effective Communication

The Benefits of Effective Communication

Posted on July 29, 2020

While it’s no secret that effective communication is essential for healthcare teams to provide high-quality care to patients, it’s also the backbone of an efficient hospital management team.

Rural Communities Improving Treatment for Opioid Use Disorder

Rural Communities Improving Treatment for Opioid Use Disorder

Posted on July 22, 2020

The latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on opioid misuse in America are encouraging. In 2018, the drug overdose death rate was lower in 14 states than in 2017. Four of those states—Kentucky, West Virginia, Maine and Iowa—are predominantly rural, meaning more than 50% of their residents live in rural areas.

As COVID-19 Cases Increase, Challenges Mount for Rural Healthcare Providers

As COVID-19 Cases Increase, Challenges Mount for Rural Healthcare Providers

Posted on July 14, 2020

Rural hospitals have no shortage of problems that present a drag on their bottom lines: low patient volumes, provider shortages, regulatory burdens, high prescription drug costs.

Community Health Needs Assessment—So Much More Than a Regulatory Requirement

Community Health Needs Assessment—So Much More Than a Regulatory Requirement

Posted on July 07, 2020

Every three years nonprofit hospitals and federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) are required to conduct a community health needs assessment (CHNA).

How COVID-19 Will Affect Rural Hospitals’ Revenue Cycle Management

How COVID-19 Will Affect Rural Hospitals’ Revenue Cycle Management

Posted on July 02, 2020

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has been a drag on the bottom lines of many rural hospitals, despite the fact that the disease has yet to fully infiltrate many rural areas. One of the reasons for this is the sharp decline in patient volumes. At least 15 rural hospitals have closed their doors so far in 2020, with many citing declines in patient volumes as a reason.

Industry Trends Impacting Rural Nursing  Part 2

Industry Trends Impacting Rural Nursing Part 2

Posted on June 17, 2020

According to the United States Census Bureau, about 60 million people, or one in five Americans, live in rural America. In general, rural areas are sparsely populated, have low housing density, and are far from urban centers. While urban areas make up only 3 percent of the entire land area of the country, they are home to more than 80 percent of the population.

Transitional Care Management: Unlocking the Key to Better Outcomes (and HCAHPS Scores)

Transitional Care Management: Unlocking the Key to Better Outcomes (and HCAHPS Scores)

Posted on June 10, 2020

In 2013, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services introduced transitional care management (TCM) codes, a set of services designed to, as the name suggests, improve the care transition following a hospitalization. Since the program’s start, more than 5 million TCM claims have been filed, representing total reimbursement in 2018 of $243 million, according to a recently published JAMA article.

Interim Leaders: Filling the Gaps During Recovery and Beyond

Interim Leaders: Filling the Gaps During Recovery and Beyond

Posted on June 04, 2020

Every hospital board understands the role interim leaders play when an executive leaves the organization, whether suddenly or because of a planned departure. At a minimum, an interim keeps the seat warm as the hospital searches for its next permanent leader.

Industry Trends Impacting Rural Nursing  Part 1

Industry Trends Impacting Rural Nursing Part 1

Posted on May 28, 2020

According to the United States Census Bureau, about 60 million people, or one in five Americans, live in rural America. In general, rural areas are sparsely populated, have low housing density, and are far from urban centers.

Making the Connection: Annual Wellness Visits and Care Coordination

Making the Connection: Annual Wellness Visits and Care Coordination

Posted on May 20, 2020

Despite Annual Wellness Visits (AWV) being covered by Medicare since 2011, they remain misunderstood – and not only by the patients who might benefit most from them, but also by primary care providers.